Illustrated Articles

Infectious Diseases

  • Blepharitis means inflammation of the eyelid. In most cases, the inflammation affects the outer two layers of the eyelids; in some cases it may spread to involve the inner lining or palpebral conjunctiva.

  • Campylobacter infection or Campylobacterosis is a bacterial intestinal infection cased by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter upsaliensis. It is a major cause of human bacterial enteritis although it is considered a normal bacterium in the intestinal tract of many animals and birds.

  • Candida albicans is a common environmental fungus that can affect the digestive tracts of birds. It is a common cause of 'sour crop' or a crop infection (ingluvitis), especially in young birds. Candida can be a primary or secondary cause of crop infections. Often, other diseases compromise the bird's immune system and predispose a bird to secondary Candida infection (candidiasis).

  • Brucellosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria from the genus Brucella. There are different species of Brucella that infect sheep, goats, cattle, deer, elk, pigs, dogs, and other animals.

  • Histoplasmosis is a chronic, non-contagious fungal infection caused by the soil-dwelling fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Histoplasma capsulatum is found globally and may infect both humans and animals. However, histoplasmosis is uncommon to rare in all but dogs and cats.

  • The normal lens in the eye of any animal is clear and colorless. A cataract is an increase in the density or opacity of the lens; it is often observed as whiteness within the pupil. Cataracts are often seen in canaries and less often in Amazon Parrots, African Grey Parrots, and Macaws. Cataracts decrease the visual acuity of the bird and may eventually lead to blindness.

  • Cheyletiellosis is an uncommon but highly contagious skin parasite of dogs, cats and rabbits caused by Cheyletiella spp. mites. It is also referred to as "walking dandruff" due to the appearance of the large, whitish mites as they crawl across skin and fur, and the excessive scaling that accompanies the infection.

  • Feline chlamydial conjunctivitis, or chlamydophila (previously known as feline pneumonitis) is an infection caused by a bacterial organism called Chlamydophila felis. Although the term pneumonitis implies inflammation of the lungs, the most common signs of infection involve the eyes or the upper respiratory tract (nose or throat), and only when infection is not treated does it spread to the lungs.

  • Chlamydophilosis, also called "psittacosis", “chlamydiosis” or "Parrot Fever", is a reasonably common disease of birds. It can occur in any bird but is especially common in cockatiels, Amazon parrots and budgerigars (often referred to incorrectly as parakeets.)

  • The upper respiratory tract includes the nose, the throat (pharynx and larynx), and the trachea (windpipe). The term "chronic" means “long lasting.” When clinical signs of upper respiratory tract inflammation, such as sneezing or nasal and ocular (eye) discharge, persist over weeks or months, or when they tend to recur at intervals of a few weeks, this is referred to as Chronic Upper Respiratory Tract Disease.